Asbestos building products were widely popular across the globe in the 1940-1970s. That’s because of the many benefits were offered by these products: flexibility, strength, and insulation properties of asbestos are far superior to most other building products. But with research revealing the devastating effects of asbestos on human health, the material was finally banned in 1977.

The widespread use of asbestos has left a nasty legacy with millions of homes around the world containing asbestos products. If your home was built before the 1980s, your home is sure to contain asbestos materials. If so, you should be cautious when deciding to repair or renovate your home. This article provides information on what you need to look out for when renovating your asbestos-containing home.

Asbestos and Health

You’ve probably seen the commercial above about mesothelioma and workers who may be compensated. Well, that’s because of the devastating effects of asbestos on human health.  Breathing in asbestos dust is dangerous and it can cause various respiratory illnesses like mesothelioma, lung cancer, and asbestosis. The more you inhale asbestos dust, the more prone you are to one of these illnesses.

Where is asbestos found in my home?

If your home was built before 1977, it likely contains asbestos products in the following areas:

  • roofing (flat roofs more commonly)
  • insulation
  • flooring – vinyl or linoleum and glue adhesive
  • fiber siding
  • window caulk
  • water piping
  • some paints (more likely will need to check for lead paint)
  • soundproofing
  • oil/coal furnace door gaskets

See this awesome graphic below for more places asbestos may be hiding:

Asbestos products in the home

Good news and Bad news about Asbestos

The good news is, asbestos doesn’t present any risk until the material is disturbed. If your home currently has some of the above products, as long as you’re not disturbing them, you should be fine.

The bad news is, if you plan on renovating your home or replacing something simple like the vinyl flooring, you may be in for some costly repairs. Before you start any DIY repair or renovation project in your home where asbestos is present, you need to assess the size of the project and how you will dispose of the asbestos material safely. The best thing is to work with a licensed asbestos removal company in Columbus.

Professional Asbestos Removal is Required

Because of the dangers of asbestos, local government offices require special licenses for contractors to be able to removed asbestos material.  Hiring a licensed contractor will ensure all applicable tests are performed, the material is removed and disposed of in a scientific manner, and you or your loved ones are protected during such a process. The best way to find the right contractor is through the EPA office here in Columbus.

A few of the items required from by contractor during asbestos removal are approved respirators, disposable clothing, and HEPA vacuums. These will be just a few of the points checked by the asbestos inspector.

Cost of removal is obviously a factor and can increase when the company has to remove hidden asbestos under the roof sheets and other inconvenient areas of the building. But this DIY project is one you’ll want to skip so your long-term health isn’t affected.

Proof of Asbestos Removal when you Sell your House

DIY projects are great but often the quality of work may be a question by the future buyer. This is especially true when it comes to asbestos removal. When you go to sell your home in Columbus, you want the future buyers to know with 100% certainty that the asbestos in the home has been properly removed and they will never have any health issues. With proof of asbestos removal completed by a licensed contractor and the work inspected by the proper authorities, these documents will give your buyers confidence and help you sell your home quickly.

If you need help selling your home or your home has asbestos and you want to sell without hiring a contractor, give Recrafted Real Estate a call. We can buy your home in as-is condition, saving you thousands of dollars in unnecessary repairs.